Nail hygiene – All you need to know!

Nail hygiene includes diligently cleaning and trimming fingernails, which may harbor dirt and germs and can contribute to the spread of some infections, such as pinworms. Fingernails should be kept short, and the undersides should be cleaned frequently with soap and water. Because of their length, longer fingernails can harbor more dirt and bacteria than short nails, thus potentially contributing to the spread of infection.

Due to fixed negligence in the direction of nail cleanliness, many critical points like bacterial and viral infections come up. Often these lead to critical well being issues. Our hand hygiene is just not good until the time we clear the undersides of our nails moreover wash fingers commonly. “Most people don’t mind sharing nail clippers with others. This is however an extremely unhygienic practice. When we don’t share any of our personal hygiene products then why do we share our nail clippers? Nails harbour abundant germs, bacteria and viruses and sharing nail clippers is equivalent to exchanging those microorganisms.

It prevents bacterial and fungal infections from rising beneath our nails. It has been noticed that extended publicity to water can break nails. It is all the time advisable to put on cotton-lined rubber gloves when washing dishes, cleansing or utilizing harsh chemical substances. In order to comply with good nail hygiene, we’ve to watch out about our nail care merchandise. “Use a sharp stainless-steel nail clipper with a grime remover , that can remove the hidden germs and grime below the nails. Trim nails straight, then round the tips into a gentle curve. Always wash hands and under nails with soap and water after a nail clipping session.

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Nails are made of keratin, a protein also found in your hair and skin. While this protein serves to protect nails from damage, keratin itself can also become damaged. So the key to strong, healthy nails lies in daily nail care that will help protect the keratin.

If your nails are susceptible to breaking and damage, it could be any of the following factors:

Age
Iron deficiency
Magnesium deficiency
Vitamin B deficiency
Over-use of nail polish or acrylics
Constant wetting and drying of nails
Overexposure to moisture or chemicals

Nail hygiene

 

Daily nail care can add up to healthy, clean fingernails. Outside of the times you have dirty fingernails, here are some tips for daily care:

Keep your nails short. Evenly trimmed, short nails are less likely to collect bacteria and dirt. Check your nails every morning or evening after a shower, when they’re easier to cut. Ensure they’re all a short, manageable length. Never share your fingernail clippers to reduce infection risks.

Get soap and water under your nails when you wash. Always pay attention to your nails when you wash your hands. In a study of four hand hygiene methods among dental assistants, hand-washing with antibacterial soaps and using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer were both effective in reducing bacteria on the fingertips. Whatever cleaning method you use, don’t forget your fingertips and nails. Dry your hands thoroughly. This minimizes the likelihood a nail infection will occur and prevents water from softening the nails too much. Moisturize. Apply a moisturizer to hands, nails, and cuticles. This will keep your nails flexible and healthy.

Nail brushes are small, handheld brushes that closely resemble a toothbrush for the fingernails. Some people use them to get those hard-to-reach areas under the nails while they’re washing their hands.

While some people may feel that nail brushes help to get their nails super clean, a study published in the Journal of Hospital Infection didn’t find any differences among people who used nail brushes and nail picks and those who didn’t when washing their hands.

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